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Monthly Archives: November 2013

In a cool demonstration of the relativity of time, HereIsToday offers some perspective on today in comparison to various lengths of time. Pretty neat!

A view of the first graphic on the page

A view of the first graphic on the page

http://hereistoday.com/

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A tranquil spot along my new hiking route

A tranquil spot along my new hiking route

As the year winds down (is 2013 really almost over?!) I’m coming to the end of my second 6-month plan and to the anniversary of starting this blog. All in all, it’s been an exciting, challenging, and rewarding year.

A few thank you’s and some updates on my current plan:

To my support team–thank you for your wisdom, listening ears, thoughtful advice, and unwavering support. I love you all.

In regards to my plan, I consider it a success! If you don’t know, I started my new job in October. I’m working at USD as a Project Assistant for Climate Education Partners. So far I love the work, the people, and the mission. So grateful. As for my workout routine, I started lagging a few weeks in. I’m still doing something active once a week (like hiking!), but I’ve fallen off in frequency. Still, I’m quite pleased, and my new job includes short bits of walking.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

One of the things I miss about Christmas at my grandma's is this small ceramic Christmas tree with built-in lights.

One of the things I miss about Christmas at my grandma’s is this small ceramic Christmas tree with built-in lights.

Listening to Brene Brown discuss gratitude (part of Brene’s e-course) six words struck me: grief is the loss of normal. In wrapping my head around loss and grief, I’ve heard a lot of descriptions. These six words come the closest to defining my experience. Grief is the loss of normal. I miss the phone calls, the text messages, the lunches between class, the pep talks, the laughter, the smiles. I miss the sound of their voices and the way they speak. I miss just being around them. 

To go with this, Brene asks why we miss the normal when it’s gone, but before that we often complain about how dull and un-extraordinary our lives are. We want so badly to be special that we forget to be grateful for the things that bring us joy. 

The beauty of diverse ideas is evident throughout Manhattan

The beauty of diverse ideas is evident throughout Manhattan

When an artist lets go of ownership of her art so her young daughter can doodle on it, the results are beautiful. Both visually and metaphorically, the drawings fascinated me. There’s something wonderful about sharing. In fact, it reminds me of one of my favorite quotes:

“No one has the fullness of the truth.

It is through dialogue, conversations,

that we come to the greater truth.”

-Sister Virginia Rodee

The mother’s portraits and the daughter’s sketches combine to provide something greater than either is alone.

Check out the mother-daughter drawings here
http://distractify.com/fun/illustrator-draws-faces-lets-4-year-old-draw-bodies-ends-up-with-adorably-weird-art/

In Marie’s most recent episode, she talks with Susan Cain, author of Quiet and leader of an introvert movement. (I’ve listened to the beginning of Quiet on audiobook, and so far I love it!) As someone who is not extroverted, I appreciated the networking advice from Susan. In particular, I love the idea of finding one kindred spirit at an event, rather than “making the rounds”.  I also love hearing Marie needs to veg out after a while at parties, because I cannot count the times at family gatherings when I’ve drifted off to a quiet corner.

Also, if you’re wondering if you are introverted or extroverted, check out the assessment. (I test somewhere between an ambivert and an introvert.)

Watch the interview here

First off, this post almost exactly captures my own transition from the Bay Area to L.A. From my “cozy, little life in Northern California” to “soul-sucking traffic, feeling like you aren’t nearly thin/tan/beautiful/not-human enough, and endless conversations about which juice cleanse is the best”. And also how for two years I was constantly “muttering about how I missed the cold, NPR with my mom, and people who honked to say hello and not crush my spirit.” Having my own experience understood so well by another person is incredibly validating, so that’s reason #1 that I’m re-blogging this.

Number 2 is a little vain. I know the guy in the video at the end! We both attended UCLA, and I actually ended up at a Giants game with him by happenstance. I also bring this up–not just to brag about my proximity to internet celebrity–but to highlight that this guy is just a regular guy. I think I frequently forget that the people’s whose opinions and stories I encounter online, I forget that those people are real people. They aren’t actors in some movie called Life. They are people who went to school, who have friends, who live lives, and who on occasion go to baseball games with near-strangers. I like knowing this people are real people, too.

Thought Catalog

Last year, I packed up my entire cozy, little life in Northern California and moved to the city where all your dreams come true (if your dreams include soul-sucking traffic, feeling like you aren’t nearly thin/tan/beautiful/not-human enough, and endless conversations about which juice cleanse is the best): Los Angeles. Okay, it’s actually not THAT bad, but that article is for another time and another place (lamest cliff-hanger in the history of ever. You don’t care. Please care. Love me!).

Change of any kind tends to send my routine driven brain into total panic and I seek shelter in the two things that have always been a constant in my life: my bed and all 10 seasons of Friends.  However, one of the first friends (actual friend, sorry Ross, Rachel, Phoebe, Joey, Chandler, Monica…) I made in Lalaland, and now I’m lucky enough to call her my roommate, refused to let…

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