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Monthly Archives: December 2013

You all know I love Brene Brown. I think that’s clear. I’ve mentioned her in at least 14 blog posts to date. Make that 15.

 

One of the concepts that I particularly love is the difference between empathy and sympathy. It’s one that I knew on some subconscious level, because some people’s responses to my hard times felt like connection and comfort and others felt empty and unhelpful. Brene’s words clarified what I felt.

 

Now her explanation has an adorably animated video to go with. Who can resist hand drawn animals? Not me!

Watch the video here

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A year ago I started a blog. In my “I just graduated and have no clue what to do with my life HALP ME PLEEZ” breakdown/spiritual awakening/quarter-life unraveling, I found an e-book that said make a blog. (It also said a whole lot more.)

I’ve used this blog as a treasure chest of the videos and ideas that have moved me. As I love collecting mementos, I’m grateful to have this digital scrapbook of sorts.

I am also grateful for the changes in my life that have paralleled this blog, many of which I’ve alluded to.

Most of all, I’m grateful simply to have this opportunity, to be alive today, to be healthy, to have access to the internet and to its rich trove of thoughts. I’m grateful.

 

Here’s to happy holidays and a new year filled with new adventures!

With love,

B.

In less than 3 minutes, this video shows how one man used his gifts to make the world a little better. With his love of photography, Bob Carey decided to do something to make his wife’s cancer treatments a little brighter. He took photos of himself in a pink tutu.  The combination of fascinating photographs and touching compassion makes this a video I wanted to share.

(And I’m not the only one sharing. The video even has a BuzzFeed page!)

 

Watch the story here

Capturing Pro Infirmis’s fascinating campaign “Because who is perfect? Get closer.”, this video shows what happens when mannequins are modeled after people with “scoliosis or brittle bone disease.” 

I love how the team transforms mannequins–which I usually find grossly unrealistic–into something so human. If you support diversity or embrace the beauty of humanity, it’s 5 minutes well spent.

Watch the video here

In a 6-minute TED Talk, Angela Lee Duckworth speaks a truth that I know to be true from my own experiences: grit is the best indicator of future success. It’s not talent, or smarts, or how quickly we can learn new things. It’s about learning from our failures and trying again anyway. As Angela points out, our brains rewire themselves with each new experience, so grit is the ability to retry a problem until we have enough experience to solve it.

Watch the video here